Pages

1920 X 1080 Hd Wallpaper

If you haven’t had the pleasure of viewing a Blu-Ray movie or disc, you just may be asking yourself:
Why do I need a Blu-ray Player?
Here’s your simple answer: You need a Blu-ray System for the High Resolution and Supreme Audio! But to really understand the full reasons behind owning a Blu-ray system, you much have a basic understanding of High Resolution, 1080p and High Definition Televisions.
Mainly because, high resolution is at the heart of why you should want a Blu-ray player. It is often the driving force or factor why anyone buys a Blu-ray player: you get much superior visuals and a much better audio experience from a Blu-ray than you will get from a standard DVD. Resolution simply means the sharpness of the picture, commonly measure in “lines”. Obviously, the greater the number of lines, the sharper your picture will be.
Interlaced(i) vs Progressive(p) Scanning
Now you have probably heard of Interlaced and Progressive scans which are two methods of how these lines are displayed. Interlaced scan displays all the odd number lines first, followed by all the even number lines. Whereas a progressive scan displays all the lines sequentially from top to bottom. Remember, progressive scanning is the better method since it produces a smoother video which has a clearer image, especially with fast-moving scenes.
So, if progressive is better, why would you want to settle with interlaced. One good thing about interlace is the less amount of data going through the connection. This enables a more proficient transmission of signals and to manufacturer hardware which can display the picture.
1080i vs 1080p
If you have bought an HDTV set lately, you will know 720p,1080i and 1080p are terms used to describe the native resolution of an HDTV, this is the resolution that’s shown on your HD Television whether it be a broadcast image or whether it’s one produced from a disc. The numbers 720 or 1080 refers to the number of horizontal lines which fill the screen. Obviously since 1080 has the more lines, it will be the higher resolution. Standard definition is much lower at 480i.
There are usually just five common resolution standards. They are 480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i and
Standard DVD Resolution:
480i – 640 pixels per line which has 480 horizontal lines – displayed alternately. In other words, Interlaced Scanning where all the odd lines are displayed, then followed by all the even lines. (Standard Definition TV)
480p – 720 pixels per line which has 480 horizontal lines which uses Progressive Scanning – each line displayed following another. (Standard Definition DVD)
High Definition Blu-ray Resolution:
720p – 1,280 pixels per line which has 720 horizontal lines – displayed thru Progressive Scanning – each line displayed following another. (720 High Definition TV)
1080i – 1,920 pixels per line which has 1,080 horizontal lines – displayed alternately. Interlaced Scanning – all the odd lines are displayed, then followed by all the even lines. (1080i High Definition TV)
1080p – 1,920 pixels per line which has 1,080 horizontal lines – displayed progressively. Progressive Scanning – each line displayed following another. (1080p High Definition TV/ Blu-ray Disc)
Why Is Blu-ray The Best?
You’re probably wondering why everyone is singing the praises of Blu-ray and why it’s the best system if you want the sharpest images? While almost all HDTV offer 720p/1080i and 1080p resolutions – only Blu-ray can deliver full 1080p content. High definition TV broadcast have a maximum resolution of 720p or 1080i. Remember your TV will display or show the best quality it can, based on the content being provided. The best POSSIBLE resolution of 1080p, also known as Full HD, is displayed with the Blu-ray player.
This full High Definition format has digital sampling structure of 1920(H) x 1080(V) which operates at 24-frames per second progressively scanning. Keep in mind, other video resolutions are possible with your TV such as 720p, 1080i and so on. Just because your TV screen has 1080 lines, does not always mean it is capable of displaying 1080p. Always check to be sure. Your Blu-ray player will correspond with your TV’s video parameters

No comments:

Post a Comment